Buying Honey

Here are my tips for buying honey, both for purchasing honey as ethically as you possibly can, avoiding contaminated honey, and the different types of honey available.

Bees are going through a hard time, and like so many areas of food production, standards may vary considerably in the purity of the honey, and in the way bees are kept. For many people, the welfare of bees is not even considered.

During my talks about bees, I have come to realise that many people do not understand why or how honey is made (see the links at the bottom of this feature).

Unfortunately, humanity has already lost touch with many of the aspects of food production, nature and the environment that supports us, although I'm hopeful we are seeing a reverse of this trend.

But enough of that for now, let’s get back to our tips for buying honey!

Just one word before we go any further – this website is visited by people from all over the world, and opportunities to buy honey from independent beekeepers or retailers may not be a possibility for some people. Hopefully there are some useful ideas for most visitors to this site.

1. Go Local

If possible, find a beekeeper you can trust, who is local to you. Buying honey locally will not only cut down on air miles, it will provide you with the opportunity to ask them questions about the way they keep their bees.

Contact your local beekeepers association for details of local beekeepers selling their honey. Here are some questions you could ask them, especially if you are seeking to support organic beekeeping practice:

  • how do they keep their bees? (In wooden hives or plastic hives –if you want a standard closer to organic, they should be wooden, of course)
  • where do they keep the hive? (an organic garden or farm? If in the the garden, are pesticides used?)
  • How does the beekeeper treat pests and diseases in the hive? Whatever they may say to you, there ARE alternatives to using veterinary medications. Thousands of natural beekeepers and non-certified organic beekeepers use natural methods such as oxalic acid, visual checks, herbs, lemon juice, sugar powder and so on. 
  • what do they do about feeding the bees?  Remember, honey is actually winter food stores for honey bees.  Beekeepers need to judge carefully how much honey they can take, but some beekeepers remove all the honey, and replace it with sugar, which is not as good for the bees (although it should also be stated there are times when even careful beekeepers need to feed sugar to their bees).  You can read more about this here.

2. Buying Organic Honey

Firstly, the reality of Organic Beekeeping is exceedingly complex, and in some countries such as the UK, the standards for organic certification of honey are so strict they are unworkable for the majority of beekeepers, even when the standards are very, very high. Buying honey that is certified as organic may not always be quite what it seems.  What you can do, is strive for the ‘as near as possible' standard. Again, find a local beekeeper, and ask them questions as above! 

3. Pay A Fair Price

Not only do honey bees work very hard to make honey (see How Do Bees Make Honey),

individual beekeepers go to a lot of effort and some expense to bring the honey to you!

If you are used to purchasing cheap, mass produced honey (perhaps combined with corn syrup), you will usually notice a significant difference in taste!

Savour it!

And read more about standards in cheap so-called “honey” - in this report from 2012 (copy and paste the link into your browser):

4. Buying Honey From A High Street Supermarket

Perhaps your only option is to purchase from a supermarket. In this case, my recommendation would be:

  • despite the fact that organic beekeeping and certification of organic honey is not straightforward, I do recommend it over other honeys if you must purchase from the supermarket.  Read more about organic honey. OR as a second choice;
  • look for terms such as ‘woodland honey’ or ‘heather honey’. In these situations, hopefully the bees have had access to organic foraging opportunities, even if the land is not actually certified as such (although there is no guarantee the area will be free of pollutants!). However, please note, the bees and bee hives may have been treated with veterinary medicines.

  • always look for pure honey, and check for other ingredients (unfortunately, requirements to label for added ingredients may vary by country). 

You can read more about some of the honey that has found its way onto supermarket shelves by visiting my page about high street supermarket honeys.

5. Buying Different Types of Honey

If you are buying honey, no doubt you will have noticed a vast choice available, such as:

  • single blossom honeys - this is when bees have foraged primarily on one type of flower, such as heather, acacia honey, orange blossom or clover
  • mixed flowers - such as wildflower honey.  On the other hand, local beekeepers may offer honey where bees have had the opportunity to forage on a wide variety of garden and wild flowers
  • forest honeys - from exotic and tropical honeys from far away, to more local woodland honeys
  • flavoured honeys - increasingly, we are seeing honeys spiked (or infused) with herbs and spices, such as ginger, cinnamon or chilli

Buying honey is also a matter of consistency and presentation:

  • set honey
  • runny honey
  • cut comb honey (which is runny honey, but with chunks of honey comb also in the jar - the honey comb is edible)
  • comb honey - you may find a beekeeper or specialist supplier who will allow you to purchase honey still in the comb - some beekeepers prefer it this way!

At the end of the day, the choice is yours!  But on behalf of the bees though, why not:

  • buy ethically
  • see honey as a precious treat
  • use it sparingly.

Go from Buying Honey to these resources

Organic Beekeeping
It’s not easy for beekeepers to be certified organic! Learn more!

Cooking With Honey
Check these recipe ideas for using honey with food.

How Do Bees Make Honey and Why?
It’s a fascinating process. Learn about how hard bees work to bring liquid gold too your plate, and you’ll see why honey is precious.

Save The Bees
With these quick 10 tips – easy ways for you to make a difference.

Bee Decline
What’s Happening To Our Bees?

About Honey
Lots of links to further information about honey

About Honey Bees
Learn about these amazing little pollinators!

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Book Review

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“We consider it as self evident that if the bees store honey for their own use, then honey is what they want and need. 
Sugar syrup is, at best, a poor substitute.  Therefore, we strive to leave enough honey in the hive for the bees’ winter feed”.

- Phil Chandler, "The Barefoot Beekeeper"


How far must honey bees fly to produce a pound of honey?

Find out by

clicking here!

Honey Recipes:
From cakes to dressings
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Did You Know?

Honey will keep indefinitely in a jar.

Read more facts about honey.