Varroa Treatment
Introduction To Treating Varroa Destructor





There are a number of varroa treatments used by beekeepers, but with all treatments for this dreaded mite, it is best to gain advice from your Bee Inspector with regard to the appropriate dose, in order to avoid harm to the honey bee colony. This page looks at chemical and non-synthetic controls. However, it is only an introduction at this stage. Please visit again for further information, since I am only just beginning this section of my site.



Varroa Destructor And Chemical Control

One of the perhaps controversial methods of controlling varroa mite is in the use of what are essentially pesticides to control an insect pest on another insect. These are administered to a colony by placing plastic strips impregnated with the chemical, inside the hive. An example of a chemical varroa treatment is Apistan, which is a pyrethroid pesticide – note pyrethroids are chemical pesticides also used by farmers on crops.

However, the mites have been found to develop resistances to the chemical treatments.

I found an interesting point of view expressed in a book by Phil Chandler, author of “The Barefoot Beekeeper”. He said:



“It is interesting to note that, while agri-chemical corporations, such as Bayer, were selling pyrethroids to beekeepers as mite treatments, they were simultaneously selling them to farmers to spray onto crops. It would hardly be surprising if these low-level applications onto pollen-bearing crops turn out to have contributed to the rapid build-up of pyrethroid resistance among Varroa populations in our hives.”

He then goes on to say:

“Our recent experience with Varroa has demonstrated that this pest can develop immunity to chemical treatments in a very short time. By using such an approach, we are simply helping along the evolution of the mite, by selecting for immunity to treatments: those mites that survive our assault go on to breed with other survivors, carrying the immunity as a genetic trait.”

Personally, I’m more in favour of keeping synthetic chemicals out of bee hives, especially pesticides. Here are some solutions for varroa mite, used by some beekeepers.


Icing-Sugar Treatment For Varroa (also referred to as Powdered Sugar but NOT caster sugar)

Best used with mesh floors, which allow mites to fall clear away from the bee colony. It can be applied by trickling the sugar between frames, or sieving it over the bees, or blowing it. It works by causing the mites to lose their grip on the body of the bee, hence they fall off. Icing sugar can also be applied when introducing a new swarm to an empty hive, to protect against any mites that may have hitched a lift into their new home.



Other Natural/Non-Synthetic Varroa Treatments

These include formic, oxalic and lactic acids. Lemon juice is of course acidic. I read an interesting study that showed lemon juice to be effective in controlling varroa mite, with reduction of Varroa to reach upto 86.6%. You can read about this study here:

Varroa and Lemon Juice Treatment



Thymus powder (as in, derived from the Thymus or Thyme plant) can also be placed inside the hive on a shallow tray.




Do neonicotinoid pesticides make honey bees more vulnerable to Varroa?




Varroa - What is it?

Honey Bee Deaths Explored



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