Beekeeping A-Z:

Here we have a Beekeeping A-Z. 

To go to the beginning, please see the link at the bottom of the page.

Please note, this is a work in progress with more information being added on a regular basis.


Bee Balm
Plants from the genus, such as Monarda fistulosa (Wild Bee Balm).  These plants are loved by bees, and useful in a bee-friendly garden.  See these lists of bee plants.


Bee Brush
A soft brush used to brush bees away from frames, or even to try and gently coax bees from one place to another.  It is possible to make a soft bee brush from a feather.  Read more.


Stretching back many years, from honey gathering to the traditional methods used to exploit bees for honey, and an ever growing movement toward bee-friendly beekeeping.   Read more about the history of beekeeping and natural beekeeping.

Bee space
A space between frames in which bees do their work.  It also enables beekeepers to more easily remove frames from hives.


Honey bees make beeswax for use in the construction of cells that compose the honeycomb, and also for capping cells filled with honey.  It is produced by 8 glands which are on the abdomens of worker honey bees.  Go from beekeeping lexicon to read more about beeswax.


Black Bee
Apis mellifera mellifera, also known as the British black bee and the north European black bee.  It was devastated in Britain by a disease in the early 20th century.  However, it is claimed there are still some small areas in Britain where the native Black bee can be found.


The larval form of bees through to the point of capping  – i.e. the immature stage of the bee (eggs, larvae and pupae):

  • prior to capping (eggs and larvae)
  • capped – (larvae that will pupate and become adult bees).

Read more about the honey bee life cycle.


Brood Chamber
Where young bees are raised.  Honey may also be stored here. Read more about why bees make honey and how bees make honey.


Buckfast Bee
A hybrid of bee developed at Buckfast Abbey in Devon, England, from many honey bees from around the world, especially the European Black Bee and the Italian bee.  This bee was developed by Brother Adam, a Benedictine monk n response to acarine, which had almost wiped out the native British black bee.  It is reported to be a docile and productive, but true Buckfast bee queens are only obtainable from a few specialist breeders.  Buckfast Abbey no longer uses Brother Adam’s breeding system.


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Before You Start....

Considerations For Urban Beekeepers