A to Z of Honey Bees And Beekeeping: U - Z

A 
B
C - D
E - F

G - J
K - P
Q - T
U - Z (this page)

U

 

Urban beekeeping
With larger proportions of the population in most countries living in urban areas, the practice of urban beekeeping has increased.  It has its only particular set of considerations.  Read more about urban beekeeping.


V

Varroa Destructor
A reddish brown mite that sucks the haemoglymph (bee blood) of honey bees, and lay their eggs in honey bee brood cells.  They spread diseases to honey bees.  Read more about Varroa.

Venom

Venom from bee stings is a complex mixture, containing pharmacologically active proteins, peptides and enzymes. A single sting contains about 50 micrograms of venom.  Read more about bee venom.

 

Vitellogenin
An egg protein stored in the fat bodies in the abdomens and heads of honey bees (although it is also found in other species, such as fish).  The fat body acts as food/energy storage, but also the vitellogenin acts as an anti-oxidant.

 

Von Frisch, Karl (1886-1982)
Austrian zoologist and entomologist, who discovered that bees communicate with each other using a kind of dance – the waggle dance’, to indicate the locations of sources of nectar.



W

 

Waggle dance
A figure of eight dance performed by honey bees to communicate the location of nectar food sources to other members of the honey bee colony.  Read about the Waggle Dance.

 

Wax
Made by bees for the construction of cells for larvae and honey.  Wax is also used to cap cells when the nectar gathered by honey bees has completed its transformation into honey.  Read more about wax.

 

Wax moth (lesser wax moth - Achroia grisella; greater wax moth – Galleria mellonella)
Cause serious damage as they feed on the wax of combs, leaving a silky, matted debris.

 

WBC Hive
A bee hive designed by William Broughton Carr in 1890, which has a pagoda-like appearance.  See honey bee hives.

 

Worker
A female bee.  Worker bees perform many of the colony tasks, and are the most numerous of the bees within a colony. Read more about honey bee colonies.

 

 

 








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Book Review

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Gardeners Beware!


Did you know?  Bees love lime trees - but some imports are believed to be toxic for bees!

Read more

Excerpt from 'A Sting In The Tale' by Professor Dave Goulson (also author of Bumblebee Behaviour And Ecology):

Page 128:

"Buff-tailed and white tailed bumblebees love the flowers of lime trees, although there is something in the nectar which seems to make them dopey and even sometimes kill them".